DogMurderers

Off Duty Cop Kills Dog – “Because he can”

Eden police officer accused of shooting dog while off-duty

http://www2.godanriver.com/news/2011/may/22/eden-police-officer-accused-shooting-dog-while-dut-ar-1055370/

An Eden couple is still wondering exactly what happened after finding their son’s dog shot dead in a neighbor’s yard.

Bobby Ritchie said he was watching a NASCAR race May 14 with Neko, a two-year-old, 70-pound American bulldog boxer mix, sleeping between his legs. He and his wife Linda Ritchie were watching Neko and Zoe, a rescued black lab mix, for their son Chris Ritchie while he was on vacation.

Bobby said decided to take his son’s two dogs and his dog across the street to his mother’s house so they could run in her fenced-in backyard. He said this was something he had done on many occasions, without a leash. Around 6 p.m., his dog went into the backyard while Neko and Zoe were playing and started to chase each other through the neighborhood.

“I was right behind them, chasing them, and they were just at the top of the second street,” he said. “I thought they crossed the street and ran over to the golf course area, so I ran back into the house where my wife and her friend were sitting and told my wife to get her car keys because Chris’s dogs got away and they’re running in the neighborhood.”

After driving down the street in her car, Linda said she came back to her house to retrieve her cell phone just in case Bobby called with news of finding Neko and Zoe. When she got back to the house, she found her friend on the front porch asking, “Who was doing all that shooting?”

“I said I didn’t hear it, but as soon as she said it, I knew the dog had been shot,” Linda said. “My friend said she heard the shots as I was backing out of the driveway to look for the dogs the first time. That’s how fast it happened.”

Linda said she pulled up at the last house on the left on Camellia Lane because that’s where her friend said the shots were heard. She said she found a lady standing in the driveway talking to someone when she asked her if she had seen a brown and white dog come by.

“She said she had seen the dog but that he wasn’t there, so I asked her which way he went, and that’s when she said wait a minute and got her husband,” Linda said.

According to Linda Ritchie, Eden Police Officer Jamie Buffkin came outside in his police uniform and asked her if she had a pit bull. She said she told him no, and he asked what he was.

“I told the officer, ‘He is an American bulldog pit bull mix, not a pit bull,” Linda Ritchie continued. “That’s when the officer said, ‘I thought he was a pit bull – I shot your dog.’ I just immediately fell apart.”

When asked why he shot the dog, Linda said Officer Buffkin told her Neko lunged at him.

“This is the most gentle dog in the world and he has never lunged at anyone; he has never been in a dog fight – he’s a house pet,” Linda said. “He told me if I got my husband, he would let us come back and get the dog. He also said, ‘I didn’t shoot the black one.’”

Linda said went over and got Bobby Ritchie and told him what happened. Bobby Ritchie said he didn’t realize how many times Neko had been shot until he picked him up to bring him home.

“After I laid the dog in our driveway, I went back over and asked the officer how many times he shot the dog. He said four times because the dog kept lunging at him. There’s no way the dog could keep lunging at him (after being) shot that many times. So I lost it. I got real upset and said some things to the officer I probably shouldn’t have, because he asked me to leave his property.”

A citation was written to the Ritchies for a city ordinance violation of a dog running loose. According to the incident report filed with the Eden Police Department, Buffkin said the dog charged at him while he was on the back porch. Buffkin said two dogs, one black and one brown and white, had cornered his dog on his back porch. According to the report, he said he tried to move the dogs on, but when he walked out the door, the dogs started barking at him. Buffkin said the brown and white dog then charged at him.

The report states Buffkin fired four shots from his .40-caliber Glock off-duty weapon. It also states the dog then turned and went out into the yard and laid down. There are no mentions of bites, cuts or bruises inflicted by the animal in the incident report.

The Ritchies said there are many discrepancies in the police report and the story they were told by Officer Buffkin the night of the incident.

“If the dog wandered off his deck and went down and flopped down in the yard after being shot four times, I would assume his head would be pointing away from the deck,” Bobby said. “The dog was laying in the yard with his head pointing toward the deck. He also didn’t mention anything about him thinking the dog was a pit bull in the police report.”

Linda Ritchie said she may have seen a different perspective if the officer had offered any type of apology.

“He has yet to apologize to any of us,” she said. “If he had been a little more remorseful, I might feel a little differently. But it was just like ‘He’s a pit bull. I shot him. Take it or leave it. It’s my yard.’”

Linda Ritchie said they have contacted the officer’s superiors at the Eden Police Department, Eden’s city manager and two councilmen. She said they are also considering hiring an attorney, but will wait to see if the city will offer a thorough investigation into the events.

According to the City of Eden Code of Ordinances, a vicious dog is defined as: “Any dog that has made one or more unprovoked attacks on a human by biting or causing abrasions or cuts of the skin, or any dog who makes repeated attacks on farm stock or pet animals.” An at-large dog is defined in the Code of Ordinances as off the property of its owner and not under restraint.

Linda Ritchie formally addressed city council members at Tuesday’s meeting about the incident. City Attorney Erin Gilley advised against any council members or city employees speaking about the situation. She said the police department is currently conducting an investigation and the results are pending.

Durham SWAT Executes Dog – Caught On Tape [VIDEO]

http://abclocal.go.com/wtvd/story?section=news/abc11_investigates&id=8140686

Police decision to shoot dog questioned
Thursday, May 19, 2011

By Kelli O’Hara

DURHAM (WTVD) — Did a member of a Durham police SWAT team go too far when he shot and killed a dog during a raid in April? Some say it was unnecessary force.

ABC11 cameras captured the incident at a home on Dunstan Avenue April 12.

Officers were looking for Pete Moses and Vania Sisk. According to search warrants, Moses is a suspect in the disappearance of a woman and a 5-year-old boy. Sisk is the boy’s mother.

While they’ve not been charged in the disappearances, the SWAT team arrested the pair on other charges at the Dunstan Avenue home after surrounding it the evening of April 12.

After the people in the home surrendered, the SWAT team approached to make sure no one else was inside. As ABC11 cameras recorded, the lead officer went up the front steps and then turned and fired at a dog three times – killing it.

The dog doesn’t appear to be vicious and doesn’t appear to lunge at officers. In the video, you can see a man sitting on the stoop of a home next door and others standing on the next porch as the three high-powered rounds were fired in their direction.

The bystanders were not hurt.

Eighteen-year-old Deshawn Porter told ABC11 the dog – a lab named Sheba – was his best friend.

“I didn’t know what to say,” he said. “My neighbor says they shot my dog several times.”

Porter said he asked police why the dog was killed.

“He said the dog was getting vicious and ready to attack,” said Porter.

But that’s not how others saw it. ABC11 asked the Durham Police Department about the incident. It said the officers were making a high-risk entry and the dog appeared to growl and make aggressive moves.

We showed the video to Kimberly Alboum, state director for the Humane Society.

“That’s devastating,” she said. “Wow, that’s absolutely devastating. That’s just shocking.”

Alboum said she sees in the video a SWAT team that needs to be trained in dealing with dogs.

“The way it appears on this footage, is that it was just a dog standing up watching them come up on the stairs,” she said.

Porter told ABC11 he’s sad, angry, and lonely without Sheba around.

Porter said he didn’t witness the shooting because he was among those in the house that night who were detained. He is not charged with any crime.

After the standoff, he said police did not apologize and took his dog’s body with them when they left the scene. He doesn’t know what was done with it.

ABC11 offered to show Durham police officials the video and to also ask if it was appropriate to discharge an automatic weapon so close to innocent civilians. They declined.

The Humane Society told us it plans to reach out to the department to offer free training on how to deal with pets in emergency situations.

Dog Owner Learns Not To Call The Police

http://www.thedenverchannel.com/news/27863147/detail.html

Family Dog Killed By Police Officer
Erie Police Officer Feels Threatened, Shoots German Shepherd
Marshall Zelinger, 7NEWS Content Producer/Presenter

POSTED: 11:01 pm MDT May 11, 2011
UPDATED: 7:55 am MDT May 13, 2011

ERIE, Colo. — A call for help to police ends with a family dog getting shot and killed by the responding officer.

Brittany Landis called Erie Police after she said she got a threatening phone call. She said she was on her porch with her two dogs, a 4-year-old German shepherd and an 11-year-old golden retriever, when Officer Jamie Chester approached through her neighbor’s yard.

“As soon as I saw him, the dogs also saw him and started just trotting over there, not rushing over there, not barking, not growling, just curious,” said Landis.
Click here to find out more!

“The two made contact, eye contact, and the officer put his hand on his weapon,” said neighbor Andy Feero. “He said something to the dog, motioning her not to move and then he started walking backwards.”

Landis said she called her dog back.

“I said, ‘Ava, nein!’ — our German Shepherd was trained in German,” said Landis.

Nein is German for no.

“She heard me. She turned and looked at me and the police officer shot her,” said Landis. “I started screaming, ‘Oh my God! What did you do? What did you do?’ He came towards me and said, ‘Ma’am, I had to do it. I had to do it.’”

Neighbors Call Shooting ‘Senseless’

“It was a senseless shooting. I didn’t hear any barking noises out of her until she got shot,” said Feero. “I saw the weapon come out and he let her have it — (from) six feet away.”

According to Erie police Lt. Lee Mathis, Chester perceived a threat to his safety and shot the dog to avoid personal injury. Mathis said the officer reported the dog was baring her teeth and had her hair standing up. He told 7NEWS officers have no obligation to get bit by a dog before protecting themselves.

“Before shooting, did the officer say anything?” asked 7NEWS reporter Marshall Zelinger.

“Nothing. No warning. No, ‘Get control of your dog.’ Not, ‘You get your dog or I’m going to shoot,’” said Landis. “To me, that’s scary. You have a police officer out on the force that is that quick to draw out his deadly weapon. That’s scary.”

Family Took Dog To CSU Vet For Necropsy

Landis told 7NEWS the dog’s body was taken to Colorado State University for a necropsy. She said she was told Ava was shot through the back.

“I was told it severed her spinal column. And it went through her liver and her lungs; it ended up in abdomen, so it hit a lot of vital organs.”

Mathis told 7NEWS the bullet went through the left shoulder of the dog.

“I want justice for my dog, for my family,” said Landis.

The same officer shot and killed a black Labrador in 2007, after it mauled a 9-year-old boy.

Police, While Trespassing, Stop To Shoot Dog (In Own Yard)

http://www.wlky.com/r/27459737/detail.html

Police Shoot, Kill Dog During Foot Chase
Doberman Shot In Own Back Yard; Police Say Dog Attacked Officer

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Police officers chased a home invasion suspect on foot through a neighborhood, but also ended up shooting and killing a dog in its own back yard.

Police said the dog attacked an officer, but the dog’s owner said that explanation is ridiculous.

“It’s heartbreaking. It’s killing me,” said Michelle Damron, the dog’s owner. “I just think shooting a dog and letting it suffer to its death because you’re too scared to get bit was wrong — especially when you came in his yard.”

Damron said she raised Rocco since he was just three days old. But on Wednesday, the 6-year-old full-sized Doberman found himself caught in the middle of a police pursuit — right outside his own cage.

Police said officers were chasing a home invasion suspect through Damron’s neighborhood on Madelon Court around 6 p.m. when the suspect darted into her back yard.

“I got up to see what was going on because the dog was raising a fit, just barking, and I saw somebody else come as I was getting to the door, and as soon as I opened the door, I heard two gunshots,” Damron said. “I looked over and my dog was hollering and there was blood everywhere, and he went inside of his dog house and eventually died.”

“He went back in there crying and screaming and eventually died. He suffered,” Damron continued. “They were chasing an armed robber and I guess he feared he was going to get bit. That dog wouldn’t have bit.”

Police said the Doberman jumped on the suspect and then attacked an officer. They said the officer had to shoot the dog in self-defense and to protect the suspect.

Still, Damron is unconvinced.

“It did not give them the right to shoot my dog. I mean, a dog is going to bark. That’s his job. He’s in his yard. You come in his yard, he’s going to bark,” Damron said.

Metro Animal Services came to remove the dog from the scene. Damron said she wants more.

“I think something ought to be done other than an apology. An apology doesn’t stop his hurt. It doesn’t stop my hurt. It doesn’t bring back my dog,” Damron said.

Police are calling it a horrible situation. But they said that doesn’t change the fact that police officers have the right to defend themselves when they’re being attacked, whether by a human or by an animal.

Police said the department is working with the dog’s owner and her family to help with the situation.

Police said the home invasion suspect was Dijon Barlow, 24. He was handcuffed and taken into custody shortly after the dog was shot. He’s being charged with fleeing or evading police, resisting arrest and third-degree criminal trespass.

VIDEO FOR THIS STORY IS LOCATED AT: http://www.wlky.com/r/27459737/detail.html

Cops Spray 33 Rounds Trying To Execute Dog [VIDEO]

http://abclocal.go.com/wpvi/story?section=news/local&id=8077437

Camden residents concerned over pit bull shooting

CAMDEN, N.J. – April 16, 2011 (WPVI) — There is controversy over the police shooting of a pit bull dog in Camden Saturday night.

There are several issues surrounding the shooting death of a neighborhood dog. Many believe the dog did not deserve to die, but many are also shaken by the number of stray bullets.

Neighbors say the dog was hit on one side of the street, but they found damage from police bullets on the other side of the street and several houses down. They say the officer’s bullets hit vehicles and even houses where there were innocent bystanders.

Sherronda Aycox was devastated over the loss of her 8-month old blue pit bull Capone, and for what she and her neighbors believe was dangerous and irresponsible behavior by Camden Police.

Residents say officers responded to a fight between teenagers around 9:00pm Friday night.

Aycox says Capone darted out of the partially opened door and toward the officers several houses down, who, according to residents, shot and killed the dog.

Aycox says police investigators told her 33 rounds were fired.

“The cop said he felt like he was going to attack him,” said Aycox, “and he just shot at him. The one cop hollered ‘don’t shoot him’, but he shot him. When he shot him, the dog fell to the ground, was shaking and crying, but he just stood over top of him and kept shooting repeatedly.”

“He just came running out of the house,” said neighbor Kelly McCulley. “He plays with the kids all the time. He saw all the kids up there and that’s what he thought, that he was coming to play, and they just shot him over and over and over.”

The dog was hit and fell in one area, but the bullets sprayed elsewhere, shooting out the window of a van that several women were getting ready to get into. The women say there were children everywhere.

Neighbors say several other vehicles were hit, and the bullets pierced a nearby home, hitting a window and a wall inside.

The family was inside watching television and had no idea what was going on.

“It was just crazy. It was like a war zone out there,” said the resident of the home.

Several attempts were made to speak with Camden officials, but there has been no response.

Cops Pepper Spray Then Shoot 12 Pound Puppy

http://www.mercurynews.com/news/ci_17850637?source=rss&nclick_check=1

Authorities shoot dog during probation search in Boulder Creek

By Stephen Baxter

Santa Cruz Sentinel
Posted: 04/14/2011 08:09:15 PM PDT

A sheriff’s deputy shot a bull terrier puppy to death when the dog rushed out of a front door and barked during a probation search on Thursday in Boulder Creek, authorities said.

About 11:30 a.m. in the 200 block of Anchor Court, two deputies knocked on the door of 48-year-old Lonni Locatelli, who was on probation for a meth-related conviction, said Sgt. Dan Campos. Loud knocking alerted Locatelli’s two dogs, a 12-pound, 5-month-old female bull terrier named Sheeba and a 2-year-old pit bull mix, Locatelli said.

The dogs barked. Locatelli was in the shower, and he heard the knocking and barking and answered the door.

As he opened the door, the dogs ran to a waist-high retaining wall above the walkway, Locatelli said. One of the deputies reached for his pepper spray and fired it at Sheeba, said Sgt. Dan Campos.

The deputy then pulled out a gun and shot the dog once, Campos said. The deputy prepared to shoot the other dog, but his partner told him to stop, Locatelli said.

“She was just barking, she never hurt anybody,” Locatelli said. “I couldn’t even believe it.”

The dog was still alive, and he picked her up and ran to his Jeep to find a veterinarian, Locatelli said.

Locatelli started driving but the pepper spray on Sheeba hindered his driving, he said. He pulled over at a bus stop and asked a man there to drive his car to the Boulder Creek Veterinary Clinic at 12870 Highway 9.

The veterinarian tried to
Advertisement
treat her but she died on the table in Locatelli’s arms, he said.

“They shot my dog for no reason. She’s like my kid. I loved that dog,” said Locatelli.

Cop Kills His Own Police Dog

http://www.miamiherald.com/2010/07/31/1754730/ex-miami-dade-police-officer-cleared.html#ixzz1JH7ZO5Sh

Former Miami-Dade police Sgt. Allen Cockfield was cleared of charges that he intentionally killed his K-9 partner in 2006.
BY DAVID OVALLE
dovalle@MiamiHerald.com

Jurors on Friday cleared former Miami-Dade police Sgt. Allen Cockfield of animal cruelty in the June 2006 death of his former partner, a rookie police dog named Duke.

When the verdict was read about 4 p.m. inside the packed courtroom, police supporters gasped loudly. Some wept.

Cockfield smiled broadly and embraced relatives. When he walked from the courtroom, fellow officers in the hall erupted into applause.

“He should have never ever been charged,” said defense attorney Douglas Hartman. “They put this guy through four years of hell.”

Cockfield, a longtime officer who was fired after his 2007 arrest, expects to get his job back, Hartman said. Cockfield declined to talk to reporters afterward.

Friday’s verdict was not wholly unexpected.

Cockfield, 55, was originally charged with misdemeanor animal cruelty and a felony count of a killing a police dog, which could have cost him his law enforcement certificate.

But Thursday, prosecutors conceded that they had not proved Cockfield intended to kill Duke when he kicked him during an ill-fated training session.

At Hartman’s request, Miami-Dade Circuit Judge Antonio Arzola tossed out the felony charge, but allowed the lesser count to stand.

Miami-Dade prosecutor Isis Perez said in closing arguments that Cockfield viciously and fatally kicked the Belgian Malinois during an “obedience control” session at the department’s training bureau.

Frustrated with Duke for barking and not obeying commands, she said, Cockfield lifted the dog up by his leash, choking him, and then delivered a series of swift kicks.

The dog yelped and died of a disruption to his heart rhythm, Perez said. She downplayed Hartman’s contention that Duke posed a threat to Cockfield. Several officers who testified against Cockfield did, too.

“Not one single witness who sat here said that Duke was attacking him,” Perez told jurors Friday.

But Hartman argued the case was a “freak training accident,” and that Cockfield was simply defending himself from an overaggressive, dangerous dog. His methods were standard training for K-9 officers, he said.

The six jurors deliberated for two hours before returning a verdict.

“The jurors have spoken and we respect their verdict,” Perez said afterward.

John Rivera, head of the PBA and a longtime critic of the Miami-Dade State Attorney’s Office, watched the trial with a contingent of union and other supporters.

“This was really sad, but yet it had a happy ending,” Rivera said.

Cop Shoots -CHAINED- Dog 6 Times

http://www.wlox.com/Global/story.asp?S=14300415

Police use deadly force on dog; Owner wonders why

By Doug Walker – bio | email

GULFPORT, MS (WLOX) – Samuel Lovato is still in shock as he recalls the terrible moment when he lost his beloved pet, Melmo, in an instant.

Police were called to a possible break-in at the house next door in the Brentwood subdivision.

“I’m coming out of the house, I just got out of the shower, to go get my dog and I’m opening my door and I see a female cop. And she shot between five and six rounds at my dog,” Lovato remembered. “I looked at her and I was shocked. And I said, ‘I can’t believe you just shot my dog,’ and I proceeded to go back in the house.”

Melmo was a big dog, more than 120 pounds, but the animal was on a chain in Lovato’s back yard. Lovato questioned the use of deadly force.

“The officer was standing approximately right about here, about 30 feet away from where the chain ends.”

After the shooting, the dog’s obviously distraught owner brought the animal for treatment at the Gulfport Veterinary Hospital, but it was too late. The wounds were too severe and the animal could not be saved.

Dr. Jerry Spears is the veterinarian who treated Melmo.

“From the wounds that I examined, it looks like it had a spinal injury which paralyzed him from the hind legs,” Dr. Spears said. “Profuse bleeding from his mouth, plus some internal injuries, both of which led us to euthanize the animal.”

Police are looking into the incident, according to Lt. Craig Petersen with the Gulfport Police Department.

“First, we need to conduct our internal investigation,” Lt. Petersen said. “I feel really bad for the gentleman and the loss of his dog, but we’ll conduct the internal investigation.”

He also said that officers have to make life and death decisions in an instant, including assessing threats from animals.

“The officer has discretion in how to protect themselves in these situations, totally up to the officer based on the facts and circumstances of that particular case.”

But this case has left a hole in Lovato’s heart that won’t heal anytime soon.

“I’ve had her for 11 years. Eleven years. She was a great dog, a good dog and she was just in her yard doing her job and just being a dog.”

There is no timetable for when the investigation will be completed. The officer involved in the shooting remains on active duty.

Creeping Police “Searching For Suspect” – Shoot Dog

http://www.wsbt.com/news/fox17-kalamazoo-officers-fatally-shoot-dog-20110408,0,2145546.story

Owners Distraught Over Shooting of Dog
Kalamazoo officers responded to the 100 Block of West Dutton to search for a suspect, when they fatally shot a dog.

Lisa LaPlante FOX 17 News Reporter
12:05 p.m. EDT, April 9, 2011

KALAMAZOO—
Police in Kalamazoo say an officer felt threatened Friday night, when a one year old pit bull was released into a backyard at a home on West Vine Avenue around 8 p.m. The officer shot the dog four times, according to the owners, killing her.

Kalamazoo Public Safety officers were tracking a suspect in the area of West Dutton and West Vine. The officers were checking the backyard and garage of a house, when the Morris family let Dot, a one year old pitt bull dog, out, unaware of the officer’s presence. According to a police report, the dog aggressively charged one of the officers.

“We had no warning police were back there,” Tara Morris told FOX 17 News. She cringed and fought back tears as she showed the spot where Dot died from the gunshot wounds.

Tara’s husband, Charles Morris, was still reeling this morning. “She was laying here, still wagging her tail,” Charles said. He says Dot was a friendly dog who never bit anyone, and believes she was excited, not attacking the officer.

The officer told superiors that he believed the dog was going to attack, and had no choice but to fire his weapon.

While Trespassing – Officer Stops To Shoot Dog

http://www.wlky.com/r/27468846/detail.html

Homepage > Louisville News
Police Shoot, Kill Dog During Foot Chase
Doberman Shot In Own Back Yard; Police Say Dog Attacked Officer

By Steve Tellier/WLKY

POSTED: 9:30 pm EDT April 6, 2011
UPDATED: 5:24 am EDT April 7, 2011

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Police officers chased a home invasion suspect on foot through a neighborhood, but also ended up shooting and killing a dog in its own back yard.

Police said the dog attacked an officer, but the dog’s owner said that explanation is ridiculous.

“It’s heartbreaking. It’s killing me,” said Michelle Damron, the dog’s owner. “I just think shooting a dog and letting it suffer to its death because you’re too scared to get bit was wrong — especially when you came in his yard.”

Damron said she raised Rocco since he was just three days old. But on Wednesday, the 6-year-old full-sized Doberman found himself caught in the middle of a police pursuit — right outside his own cage.

Police said officers were chasing a home invasion suspect through Damron’s neighborhood on Madelon Court around 6 p.m. when the suspect darted into her back yard.

“I got up to see what was going on because the dog was raising a fit, just barking, and I saw somebody else come as I was getting to the door, and as soon as I opened the door, I heard two gunshots,” Damron said. “I looked over and my dog was hollering and there was blood everywhere, and he went inside of his dog house and eventually died.”

“He went back in there crying and screaming and eventually died. He suffered,” Damron continued. “They were chasing an armed robber and I guess he feared he was going to get bit. That dog wouldn’t have bit.”

Police said the Doberman jumped on the suspect and then attacked an officer. They said the officer had to shoot the dog in self-defense and to protect the suspect.

Still, Damron is unconvinced.

“It did not give them the right to shoot my dog. I mean, a dog is going to bark. That’s his job. He’s in his yard. You come in his yard, he’s going to bark,” Damron said.

Metro Animal Services came to remove the dog from the scene. Damron said she wants more.

“I think something ought to be done other than an apology. An apology doesn’t stop his hurt. It doesn’t stop my hurt. It doesn’t bring back my dog,” Damron said.

Police are calling it a horrible situation. But they said that doesn’t change the fact that police officers have the right to defend themselves when they’re being attacked, whether by a human or by an animal.

Police said the department is working with the dog’s owner and her family to help with the situation.

Police said the home invasion suspect was Dijon Barlow, 24. He was handcuffed and taken into custody shortly after the dog was shot. He’s being charged with fleeing or evading police, resisting arrest and third-degree criminal trespass.

Go to Top